Breast Augmentation

Breast Augmentation

If you’re considering breast augmentation…

Breast augmentation, technically known as augmentation mammoplasty, commonly known as breast implants, is a surgical procedure to enhance the size and shape of a woman’s breast for a number of reasons:

  • To enhance the body contour of a woman who, for personal reasons, feels her breast size is too small.
  • To correct a reduction in breast volume after pregnancy.
  • To balance a difference in breast size.
  • As a reconstructive technique following breast surgery.

By inserting an implant behind each breast, surgeons are able to increase a woman’s bustline by one or more bra cup sizes. If you’re considering breast augmentation, this will give you a basic understanding of the procedure, when it can help, how it’s performed, and what results you can expect. It can’t answer all of your questions since a lot depends on your individual circumstances. Please ask your surgeon if there is anything you don’t understand about the procedure.

The best candidates for breast augmentation

Breast augmentation can enhance your appearance and your self-confidence, but it won’t necessarily change your looks to match your ideal, or cause other people to treat you differently. Before you decide to have surgery, think carefully about your expectations and discuss them with your surgeon.

The best candidates for breast augmentation are women who are looking for improvement, not perfection, in the way they look. If you’re physically healthy and realistic in your expectations, you may be a good candidate.

Types of implants

A breast implant is a silicone shell filled with either silicone gel or a salt-water solution known as saline.

Your plastic surgeon will discuss the risks and the benefits of each during your consultation.

Risks

All surgery carries some uncertainty and risk.

Breast augmentation is relatively straightforward. But as with any operation, there are risks associated with surgery and specific complications associated with this procedure.

The most common problem, capsular contracture, occurs if the scar or capsule around the implant begins to tighten. This squeezing of the soft implant can cause the breast to feel hard. Capsular contracture can be treated in several ways, and sometimes requires either removal or “scoring” of the scar tissue, or perhaps replacement of the implant.

For other risks involved with this procedure please consult with your surgeon. Take time to discuss each of them with your physician to make sure you understand the risks and consequences of breast augmentation.

Planning your surgery

In your initial consultation, your surgeon will evaluate your health and explain which surgical techniques are most appropriate for you, based on the condition of your breasts and skin tone. If your breasts are sagging, your doctor may also recommend a breast lift.

Be sure to discuss your expectations frankly with your surgeon. He or she should be equally frank with you, describing your alternatives and the risks and limitations of each. You may want to ask your surgeon for a copy of the manufacturer’s insert that comes with the implant he or she will use, just so you are fully informed about it. Be sure to tell your surgeon if you smoke, and if you’re taking any medications, vitamins, or other drugs.

Your surgeon should also explain the type of anesthesia to be used, the type of facility where the surgery will be performed, and the costs involved. Because most insurance companies do not consider breast augmentation to be medically necessary, carriers generally do not cover the cost of this procedure.

Preparing for your surgery

Your surgeon will give you instructions to prepare for surgery, including guidelines on eating and drinking, smoking, and taking or avoiding certain vitamins and medications.

While making preparations, be sure to arrange for someone to drive you home after your surgery and to help you out for a few days, if needed.

Where your surgery will be performed

Your surgery will be performed at an outpatient surgical center.

Types of anesthesia

Breast augmentation can be performed with a general anesthesia, so you’ll sleep through the entire operation.

The surgery

The method of inserting and positioning your implant will depend on your anatomy and your surgeon’s recommendation. The incision will be made in the crease where the breast meets the chest. Every effort will be made to assure that the incision is placed so resulting scars will be as inconspicuous as possible. Working through the incision, the surgeon will lift your breast tissue and skin to create a pocket underneath your chest wall muscle (the pectoral muscle). The implants are then centered beneath your nipples. You’ll want to discuss the pros and cons of these alternatives with your doctor before surgery to make sure you fully understand the implications of the procedure he recommends for you. The surgery usually takes one to two hours to complete. All stitches used are internal and will absorb within a few months from surgery.

You will also have tape covering your incisions and that will usually stay on 3-4 weeks.

Getting back to normal

You should be able to return to work within a few days depending on the level of activity required for your job.

Follow your surgeon’s advice on when to begin exercises and normal activities. Your breasts will probably be sensitive to direct stimulation for two to three weeks, so you should avoid much physical contact. After that, breast contact is fine once your breasts are no longer sore, usually three to four weeks after surgery.
Your scars will be firm and pink for at least six weeks. Then they may remain the same size for several months or even appear to widen. After several months, your scars will begin to fade although they will never disappear completely.

Routine mammograms should be continued after breast augmentation for women who are in the appropriate age group, although the mammographic technician should use a special technique to assure that you get a reliable reading, as discussed earlier. (see All surgery carries some uncertainty and risk.)

Your new look

For many women, the result of breast augmentation can be satisfying, even exhilarating, as they learn to appreciate their fuller appearance.

Your decision to have breast augmentation is a highly personal one that not everyone will understand. The important thing is how you feel about it. If you’ve met your goals, then your surgery is a success.

If you are considering a Breast Lift?

A breast lift is a great option for women who want to improve breast shape and position. If an increase in size is wanted you may also want to consider breast implants along with a breast lift.

The best candidates for breast reconstruction

Women who are at a stable weight, whose breasts are fully developed and who are done having children. A breast lift is an option for younger women also and is most commonly done to correct dissymmetry or uneven breasts.

All surgery carries some uncertainty and risk

Breast Lift surgery is relatively straightforward. But as with any operation, there are risks associated with surgery and specific complications associated with this procedure.

Planning your breast surgery

Be sure to discuss your expectations frankly with your surgeon. He or she should be equally frank with you, describing your alternatives and the risks and limitations of each. You may want to ask your surgeon for a copy of the manufacturer’s insert that comes with the implant he or she will use, just so you are fully informed about it. Be sure to tell your surgeon if you smoke, and if you’re taking any medications, vitamins, or other drugs.

Preparing for your Utah breast augmentation surgery

Your surgeon will give you instructions to prepare for surgery, including guidelines on eating and drinking, smoking, and taking or avoiding certain vitamins and medications.

While making preparations, be sure to arrange for someone to drive you home after your surgery and to help you out for a few days, if needed.

Where your surgery will be performed

Your surgery will be preformed at a surgical center where there are board certified anesthesiologists.

Types of anesthesia

You will go under general anesthesia so you will sleep during the entire procedure.

The surgery

There are several types of breast lifts during your consultation. Your plastic surgeon will discuss the different types and will determine which lift is going to be right for you. One of the most common patterns for a breast lift is to make an incision around the areola and vertically down the breast. Some women will also require a horizontal incision along the breast crease. Once the excess skin is removed, the breast tissue is lifted and reshaped. As your plastic surgeon is closing your incisions, the remaining skin is tightened. All of your stitches will be internal and will dissolve within a few months. You will have tape covering your incisions for extra support. The tape will fall off about 3-4 weeks after surgery.

After your surgery

You’re likely to feel tired and sore for a few days following your surgery, but you’ll be up and around in 24 to 48 hours. Most of your discomfort can be controlled by medication prescribed by your doctor. We recommend taking one week off of work or school, depending on what type of work you do.

Getting back to normal

You should be able to return to work within 1 week after surgery depending on the level of activity required for your job. Follow your surgeon’s advice on when to begin exercises and normal activities. Your breasts will probably be sensitive to direct stimulation for two to three weeks, so you should avoid much physical contact. After that, breast contact is fine once your breasts are no longer sore, usually three to four weeks after surgery.

Your scars will be firm and pink for at least six weeks. Then they may remain the same size for several months, or even appear to widen. After several months, your scars will begin to fade, although they will never disappear completely.

Your new look

For many women, the result of breast lift can be satisfying, even exhilarating, as they learn to appreciate their fuller appearance. Your decision to have a breast lift is a highly personal one that not everyone will understand. The important thing is how you feel about it. If you’ve met your goals, then your  breast augmentation surgery is a success.

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Post Major Weight Loss

A Body Lift is a surgery used to remove excess skin and fat from thighs and buttock area. This surgery is different for each patient and is often dependent on how your body heals. Below are some common questions that you will need the answers to after your surgery. Please review this material and feel free to ask about any further questions that you may have.

Body Lift is much safer if performed by someone who is Board Certified, who has completed standard full Plastic and Reconstructive \Surgery residency Certification rather than Board Certification in another unrelated residency such as Dermatology, Ophthalmology, Otolaryngology, or Gynecology. Unfortunately many of these surgeons claim to be plastic surgeons despite their limited training. Those who complete at least five years of training tailored for expertise in Plastic Surgery, rather than training in another area obtain the best training for Body Lift.

You need to schedule your surgery at a time that is convenient to take some time away from work or other duties. You will need to allow approximately one to two weeks away from work, as you will be sore and very tired after the surgery. You will gradually regain your strength and feel “normal” again in a month or two.

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If you’re considering eyelid surgery…

If you’re considering eyelid surgery, this information will give you a basic understanding of the procedure,when it can help, how it’s performed, and what results you can expect. It can’t answer all of your questions, since a lot depends on the individual patient and the surgeon. Please ask your surgeon about anything you don’t understand.

The best candidates for eyelid surgery

Blepharoplasty can enhance your appearance and your self-confidence, but it won’t necessarily change your looks to match your ideal, or cause other people to treat you differently. Before you decide to have surgery, think carefully about your expectations and discuss them with your surgeon.

The best candidates for eyelid surgery are men and women who are physically healthy, psychologically stable, and realistic in their expectations. Most are 35 or older, but if droopy, baggy eyelids run in your family, you may decide to have eyelid surgery at a younger age.

A few medical conditions make blepharoplasty more risky. They include thyroid problems such as hypothyroidism and Graves’ disease, dry eye or lack of sufficient tears, high blood pressure or other circulatory disorders, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes. A detached retina or glaucoma is also reason for caution; check with your ophthalmologist before you have surgery.

All surgery carries some uncertainty and risk

When eyelid surgery is performed by a qualified plastic surgeon, complications are infrequent and usually minor. Nevertheless, there is always a possibility of complications, including infection or a reaction to the anesthesia. You can reduce your risks by closely following your surgeon’s instructions both before and after surgery.

The minor complications that occasionally follow blepharoplasty include double or blurred vision for a few days; temporary swelling at the corner of the eyelids; and a slight asymmetry in healing or scarring. Tiny whiteheads may appear after your stitches are taken out; your surgeon can remove them easily with a very fine needle.

Following surgery, some patients may have difficulty closing their eyes when they sleep; in rare cases this condition may be permanent. Another very rare complication is ectropion, a pulling down of the lower lids. In this case, further surgery may be required.

Planning your surgery

The initial consultation with your surgeon is very important. The surgeon will need your complete medical history, so check your own records ahead of time and be ready to provide this information. Be sure to inform your surgeon if you have any allergies; if you’re taking any vitamins, medications (prescription or over-the-counter), or other drugs, and if you smoke.

You and your surgeon should carefully discuss your goals and expectations for this surgery. You’ll need to discuss whether to do all four eyelids or just the upper or lower ones, whether skin as well as fat will be removed, and whether any additional procedures are appropriate.

Your surgeon will explain the techniques and anesthesia he or she will use, the type of facility where the surgery will be performed, and the risks and costs involved. (Note: Most insurance policies don’t cover eyelid surgery, unless you can prove that drooping upper lids interfere with your vision. Check with your insurer.)

Don’t hesitate to ask your doctor any questions you may have, especially those regarding your expectations and concerns about the results.

Preparing for your surgery

Your surgeon will give you specific instructions on how to prepare for surgery, including guidelines on eating and drinking, smoking, and taking or avoiding certain vitamins and medications. Carefully following these instructions will help your surgery go more smoothly.

While you’re making preparations, be sure to arrange for someone to drive you home after your surgery, and to help you out for a few days if needed.

Where your surgery will be performed

Your surgery will be performed in a surgical center.

Types of anesthesia

You will be under general anesthesia, so you will sleep during the procedure.

The surgery

Blepharoplasty usually takes one to three hours, depending on the extent of the surgery. If you’re having all four eyelids done, the surgeon will probably work on the upper lids first, then the lower ones.

In a typical procedure, the surgeon makes incisions following the natural lines of your eyelids; in the creases of your upper lids, and just below the lashes in the lower lids. The incisions may extend into the crow’s feet or laugh lines at the outer corners of your eyes. Working through these incisions, the surgeon separates the skin from underlying fatty tissue and muscle, removes excess fat, and often trims sagging skin and muscle. The incisions are then closed with very fine sutures.

If you have a pocket of fat beneath your lower eyelids but don’t need to have any skin removed, your surgeon may perform a transconjunctival blepharoplasty. In this procedure the incision is made inside your lower eyelid, leaving no visible scar. It is usually performed on younger patients with thicker, more elastic skin.

After your surgery

After surgery, the surgeon will probably lubricate your eyes with ointment and may apply a bandage. Your eyelids may feel tight and sore as the anesthesia wears off, but you can control any discomfort with the pain medication prescribed by your surgeon. If you feel any severe pain, call your surgeon immediately.

Your surgeon will instruct you to keep your head elevated for several days and to use cold compresses to reduce swelling and bruising. (Bruising varies from person to person: it reaches its peak during the first week, and generally lasts anywhere from two weeks to a month.) You’ll be shown how to clean your eyes, which may be gummy for a week or so. Many doctors recommend eyedrops, since your eyelids may feel dry at first and your eyes may burn or itch. For the first few weeks you may also experience excessive tearing, sensitivity to light, and temporary changes in your eyesight, such as blurring or double vision.

Your surgeon will follow your progress very closely for the first week or two. The stitches will be removed two days to a week after surgery. Once they’re out, the swelling and discoloration around your eyes will gradually subside, and you’ll start to look and feel much better.

Getting back to normal

You should be able to read or watch television after two or three days. However, you won’t be able to wear contact lenses for about two weeks, and even then they may feel uncomfortable for a while.

Most people feel ready to go out in public (and back to work) in a week to 10 days. By then, depending on your rate of healing and your doctor’s instructions, you’ll probably be able to wear makeup to hide the bruising that remains. You may be sensitive to sunlight, wind, and other irritants for several weeks, so you should wear sunglasses and a special sunblock made for eyelids when you go out.

Your surgeon will probably tell you to keep your activities to a minimum for three to five days, and to avoid more strenuous activities for about three weeks. It’s especially important to avoid activities that raise your blood pressure, including bending, lifting, and rigorous sports. You may also be told to avoid alcohol, since it causes fluid retention.

Your new look

Healing is a gradual process, and your scars may remain slightly pink for six months or more after surgery. Eventually, though, they’ll fade to a thin, nearly invisible white line.

On the other hand, the positive results of your eyelid surgery-the more alert and youthful look-will last for years. For many people, these results are permanent.